Tips to Make the Most Out of a Wonderful Cup of Tea

Whenever there is a stress related incident, most people will reach for the proverbial ‘cuppa’ to calm the nerves and let the situation calm down. In these times, organic herbal tea is probably best beverage to take since it will not have any additives. Organic oolong tea is also a great beverage and will do the body good too.

In China and Japan, this drink was very revered for centuries and indeed is still held in high esteem even up to today. Ceremonies were taught to ladies on how to present the beverage to their elders or husbands and it had to be done just right otherwise the test was not passed. Every movement is succinct and if the young lady cannot grasp this then she does not graduate for sure.

This leaf was so important to trade in the past few centuries that wars were fought over it. Whoever would have thought that something so humble and common to most households these days could make men fight to the death?

Although this beverage is produced and drank in several very diverse cultures, it is still arguable which country produces the best puritans pride coupon leaf. China, India and Kenya are probably the better known countries but the biggest drinker of the beverage is arguably the British and the Chinese.

Flavored beverages hit the market in a big way some years ago and many health fanatics will tell everyone that this one or that one is the best for health. However, each individual flavor has its own benefits and it is down to the individual taste and habits of the drinker which one he or she would prefer.

Anti stress or detox drinks are very popular these days but in Kenya, most people take the drink is a style that … Read the rest

Virtual Dedicated Server Hosting: The Best Substitute for Dedicated Hosting

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A virtual private server which is considered as a secure server in the hosting world provides one of the ways of partitioning one server computer into multiple servers. VDS hosting got this name as part and parcel of its role in SEO hosting websites. The VPS acts as a dedicated server even if it shares the system resources within a physical server with other VPS systems

VDS partly acts as a shared and dedicated server at the same time because you are sharing a physical server on which you have your dedicated environment. Most people consider it a cheap alternative to a dedicated server because it is less costly than a dedicated hosting server.

VDS is considered to be a reliable hosting server because of its efficient traffic management. People having business websites prefer VDS for hosting purposes because they expect a lot of traffic on their website which is important for their business growth.

A major benefit of using this hosting server is that you can utilize full server resources. It uses a scaling technique to manage the traffic, whenever there is a rise in traffic it scales up and obtains addition server resources to manage the flow of traffic. Vice-versa when the traffic goes down it automatically scales down and leaves other resources. This mechanism gives VDS an efficient way to manage traffic.

Besides this VDS provides support for all types of application software and programming languages which include PHP, Perl, Python and more. Also, it is well configured to provide support for WordPress, Joomla, and other developing environments. As far as the security of a virtual dedicated server is concerned, you can access VDS at the root level and define your security settings. Using Cpanel you can install anti-virus, anti-spyware and can configure your firewall settings … Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest